Talks and Keynotes

Jennifer’s humor and creativity make her talks not only informative, but also very entertaining!

Innovate: Creativity in Scientific Breakthroughs

Get Inspired: Four Women Who Changed Science

Innovate: Creativity in Scientific Breakthroughs

In these times of both eco-crisis and ever-accelerating technological development, scientists are facing unprecedented challenges. They need not only superior analytical skills, but also exceptional lateral/creative thinking skills. Luckily, scientists throughout history have demonstrated exactly this mix of intellectual brainpower – and made astonishing breakthroughs. From Einstein to Meitner, from Darwin to Fleming, this talk considers how scientists use creative thinking skills, and the solutions inspired by these skills.

Special offer: Book both “Innovate (the Workshop))” and “Innovate, (the Talk)” and get a 10% discount. Add The Physics of Love and get 10% off the whole package.

“Jennifer is incredibly insightful. Her delivery feels effortless and often utilizes humor in order to connect with her audience. I would absolutely recommend Jennifer as a teacher, a public speaker and a genuine creative individual.” – Margarita Manwelyan

Get Inspired: Four Women Who Changed Science

Lise Meitner, physicist who discovered nuclear fission

Lise Meitner, physicist who discovered nuclear fission

Marie Curie wasn’t the only female scientist in history! This talk explores 4 brilliant and important women scientists: Lise Meitner, who discovered nuclear fission;  Chien-Shiung Wu, who overturned a major law in physics; Barbara McClintock, who was the Einstein of genetics;  and Shirley Ann Jackson, whose public policy work in nuclear power plant oversight impacted the US and the world.  These amazing women show what can be accomplished when passion and intelligence meet determination to overcome all obstacles.

“I really enjoyed your talk.  I was familiar with some of the oversights of women’s contributions to advances in sciences, but you didn’t just recount the history – you really showed the passion that these women had for their work.  Science is presented and discussed in such an objective and passive way that the excitement that drives most scientists can be hidden.  You reminded us how important it is to bring these personal stories – and that passion – to light.  Thank you!” – Allison Mackay, PhD., Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Connecticut

 

 

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